Free Hospitality

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Free Hospitality.jpg

In spite of rampant monetization in recent decades, most people probably technically still enjoy free hospitality, staying with close relatives such as parents or siblings. In a more cosmic sense, all of life enjoys free hospitality as guests on planet earth. In recent years, some have made conscious efforts to rediscover this spirit of global hospitality (ubuntu) whether by offering their accomodation to travellers or by travelling moneyless themselves.

Free Hospitality Websites[edit]

There are now many websites to put hosts and travellers in touch, which are good for short term hospitality of a few days. Below is a list of the main ones which do so on a gift economy basis

Focus Website Notes
International Community (Multi-language) http://www.CouchSurfing.org Large for-profit company
Global Spaceshares http://www.justfortheloveofit.org Small, non-profit organisation
Hospitality http://www.GlobalFreeloaders.com Large for-profit(?) company
Hospitality (Non-Profit, recommended) http://www.BeWelcome.org Started by a former CouchSurfing programmer who sought to make a non-profit alternative
Tourism (Multi-language) http://hospitalityclub.org Large but many members inactive, autocratic leadership style

Nomadbases[edit]

Casa Robino.jpg

Currently still few in number, Nomadbases are more permanent and tend to to be set up by folks who are politically active and ideologically committed to the gift economy. They are not generally set up by ordinary people who decided to share their home up to occasional guests, but those who have made a longer term commitment to providing hospitality to strangers. The first was Robin's Casa Robino (shown right) which offered "sustainable hospitality" in Amsterdam from 2008-2012.

Squatting[edit]

Squatting is the occupying of unoccupied properties or land. Laws against this are being tightened worldwide as the Capitalist Mentality seeks to profit from inducing scarcity where there is a reality of abundance. Wikipedia suggests that there may be as many as 1 billion squatters worldwide, 1/7 of the world's population.